The importance of character, cont’d

10 03 2009

In the last entry we told you that character matters when coaches evaluate prospects. The same values hold true in the professional ranks when scouts are determining which players they want to draft onto their teams. If an organization is going to invest big bucks in someone, that player better not be damaged goods.

Don’t believe us? Here’s proof… check out the link at the end of this post. It’s a story on former Arkansas Razorback and current Oakland Raider, Darren McFadden. The article was written the week before the 2008 NFL Draft. It chronicles McFadden’s past and concludes that success (as well as mistakes) from the past weighed heavily on Oakland’s decision of whether or not to draft him.

Consider the following quotes from the article and determine what they mean for YOU and your future. Whether or not you desire to even play college athletics, understand that Character Matters! You either have it or you don’t, and if you don’t have it, you’d better figure out a way to get it.
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“We’ve got to start looking at [your life] differently,” said McFadden’s brother. “You’re not the same little D-Dog [McFadden’s childhood nickname] who used to run around the neighborhood. You’ve got to look at the bigger picture. You can’t be out there doing things. You’ve got a lot at stake.”

Recalls Darren, “When he said that, it was like I was already thinking the same thing.”

His brother’s words were a sobering reminder to McFadden that even though he is the most talented running back in the 2008 pool, the distinction wouldn’t prevent him from falling in the draft this weekend if NFL teams decide his potential on the field is not worth the risk of embarrassing headlines off it… Suddenly, more teams say they’re as concerned with a prospect’s character as with his 40 time or his arm strength.”
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Click here to read the rest of the article.

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